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Aidan O’Brien pays tribute to super filly Minding

13 Jul 2017

Trainer says four-year-old, who has been retired, was one of the best he trained

MINDING

Minding scaled new heights in the British Champions Series. Picture: Racingfotos.com

Minding, who became the first filly to win four QIPCO British Champions Series in one season, has been retired.

Connections of the four-year-old daughter of Galileo, who won seven Group One races in total, called it a day after injury problems restricted her to just one impressive success at Naas this season.

Trainer Aidan O’Brien hailed Minding as one of the best fillies he has trained. Last year her wins included victories in the QIPCO 1000 Guineas, Investec Oaks, Qatar Nassau Stakes and QIPCO-sponsored Queen Elizabeth II Stakes.

O’Brien had hoped to welcome the filly back into training this month, but revealed she was not yet ready to return to exercise, after further X-rays carried out by vet John Halley, and cautioned about her racing future.

“She was an incredible filly and was one of the best fillies I have trained,” O’Brien told the Racing Post. “What she did was just incredible because she ran at the top level between a mile and a mile and a half as a three-year-old. To win five Group 1s at three is amazing really.

“She had the most brilliant physique and a wonderful pedigree. Above all, it was her mind that made her special because she was such a pleasure to deal with and had a brilliant attitude. She was incredibly well-named.”

Minding struck at the top level as a two-year-old when winning the Moyglare Stud Stakes and Fillies’ Mile, and completed a Classic double the following season in the QIPCO 1000 Guineas and Investec Oaks, having surprisingly been beaten in the Irish Guineas.

Her last big-race success came in October, “>when beating Ribchester in the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes at Ascot on Champions Day.

In total she won nine of her 13 starts. The news comes soon after O’Brien was also forced to retire Derby winner Wings Of Eagles.

“She injured her pastern and John [Halley, vet] just wasn’t happy for her to resume training yet,” O’Brien said. “At this stage, we felt it would be a bit of a struggle to get her back for the remainder of the season so the lads decided that the best option was to retire her as she was too important.”